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HomeNewsPluralsight One Grants $2.5 Million to Strategic Nonprofit Partners, Expanding Technology Skills...

Pluralsight One Grants $2.5 Million to Strategic Nonprofit Partners, Expanding Technology Skills Access Globally

Pluralsight, the technology workforce development company, today announced that its social impact organization, Pluralsight One, is providing $2.5 million in immediate cash grants to new and existing nonprofit partners. These grants, in addition to 41,000 free Pluralsight Skills licenses the organization is donating, will help these strategic partners expand access to technology skills development for historically underrepresented populations in the communities they serve.

“The speed of technological innovation places even greater urgency on the need for tech talent and we’re already facing significant skills shortages,” said Chris Oliver, executive sponsor for Pluralsight One. “Tapping into underrepresented communities as a source of talent will be critical to addressing these deficits. Pluralsight One and its strategic partners remain focused on addressing this issue by working to ensure that diverse communities are leading the charge in the next wave of tech innovation.”

Over the last year, Pluralsight has partnered with 10 new nonprofits including: AnitaB.org, Annie Cannons, Apprenti, Empowr Co, I.C. Stars, Intern XL, LGBT Tech, Rhiza Babuyile, Tech-Moms, and Unlocked Labs. Each of these partners’ mission aligns with Pluralsight One’s commitment to help members of diverse communities sustain careers in technology, closing tech skills gaps in the process. Pluralsight One partners will deploy their grants in a variety of ways, but all with the common objective of expanding access to technology skills around the globe.

“At Tech-Moms, we believe it’s critical to provide opportunities for women to enter the tech field, and technology upskilling is at the center of that effort,” said Trina Celeste Limpert, Co-Founder of Tech-Moms. “Our partnership with Pluralsight One helps us open the door for many women who want to break into tech while also narrowing the tech talent gap.”

Here’s how some of our partners are making an impact:

AnitaB.org — AnitaB.org programs empower women and historically excluded communities in technical fields, guide the organizations that employ them, and support the academic institutions training the next generation. AnitaB.org is driving a future where the people who imagine and build technology will mirror the people and societies for whom they build it.

Annie Cannons — AnnieCannons is on a mission to train, prepare, and connect individuals who have experienced sex trafficking to sustainable careers in tech.

Apprenti — Apprenti delivers registered apprenticeship programs to bridge the tech talent and diversity gaps. Apprenti helps employers meet evolving workforce needs and trains future tech workers with an emphasis on underrepresented groups including women, people of color, Veterans, and people with disabilities.

Empowr Co — Empowr uplifts the black community by creating a school-to-career pipeline. Their comprehensive program teaches students the tech skills they will need on the job while encouraging an entrepreneurial spirit. Upon graduation, each student obtains a job where the average salary is over six figures.

I.C. Stars — I.C. Stars works to activate a technology community of change agents to power social and economic freedom. I.C. Stars works with low-income young adults, providing them with employment opportunities and preparing them for community-based advocacy.

InternXL — InternXL increases diversity in the tech workforce by connecting students from underrepresented groups to leading STEM employers.  They provide advanced career readiness training to students with soft skill training, technical courses, enrichment resources, and certification courses.

LGBT Tech — LGBT Tech develops programs and resources grounded in empirical research that support LGBTQ+ communities, working to educate organizations and policy makers on the unique needs of LGBTQ+ individuals face when it comes to tech.

Rhiza Babuyile (RB)— A South Africa based organization, RB trains disadvantaged black youth through multidimensional programs that address healthcare, skills development, enterprise development and education. 

Tech-Moms — Tech-Moms focuses on helping women transition into the tech industry by providing technical training, career exploration, and a long-term community of support. Over the past 2 1/2 years, Tech-Moms has trained 300+ women while also creating a more diverse pipeline of talent for hard-to-fill roles in tech.

Unlocked Labs — Unlocked Labs is making tech skills accessible to incarcerated individuals. They run programs to train justice-impacted people in tech skills, run a development shop employing returning citizens and build products to solve challenges within the justice system.